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The latest news from around the National Park System.

Individually, It Doesn't Cost A Lot For A Year's Worth Of National Park Stories

As a nonprofit media organization, we depend on donations and grants to stay online. An astonishingly low portion of our readers donate to get daily news on national parks, monuments, historic sites, seashores, lakeshores, and more from the National Park System every day of the year. If everyone who stopped by the Traveler each month donated just $5 once a year, we not only could keep the Traveler online, but expand our staff by two or three positions and greatly expand the depth and breadth of our coverage.
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Saving Trees In National Parks Damaged By Hurricane Irma

Arborist Curtis Tilghman sees the national parks like no one else. He’s been in a tree over the grave of Thomas Edison. He’s cut branches under the shadow of the Statue of Liberty. He’s repaired tree damage in the Chalmette National Cemetery and cut trees from an airboat at the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve.
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Big Thicket National Preserve Recovering After Hurricane Harvey

As the Caribbean braces to take the brunt of a second hurricane in three weeks, parks in Texas are continuing to recover from destruction caused last month by Hurricane Harvey. The good news is that Big Thicket National Preserve, which experienced unprecedented flooding, is beginning to return to normal operations.
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UPDATE | Official: BLM Not Asked To Fact-Check Secretary Zinke's Monuments Draft

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's draft report on national monuments he believes should be reduced in size or opened to resource extraction was not run by U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials for fact-checking and contains a number of errors, according to agency officials.
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Secretary Zinke's Positions On National Monuments Link Him More Closely To Pinchot Than Roosevelt

Though he likes to be seen in the image of Theodore Roosevelt, by his actions Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke seems closer to Gifford Pinchot, the country's first chief of the U.S. Forest Service who viewed natural resources as existing to be consumed by people.
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Wildlife Crossing That Would Aid Mountain Lions In Santa Monica Mountains Closer To Reality

Help may be on the way for an at-risk population of mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains, as the California Department of Transportation intends to move forward with building a wildlife crossing over busy Highway 101, which could both help reduce the number of animals struck and killed by vehicles in addition to increasing the genetic diversity of the pumas by bringing new big cats into the area.
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Myriad Problems Confronting National Park Service Crews In Aftermath Of Hurricane Irma

Leaking water mains, power outages, a collapsed 40-foot section of the moat wall surrounding historic Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park, and a debris-filled waterfront at Cumberland Island National Seashore were just some of the problems National Park Service crews were dealing with Saturday as they worked to clean up the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide